World Rhino Day: 22 September

World Rhino Day: 22 September

WORLD RHINO DAY: 22 SEPTEMBER

Legal trade in rhino horn has been banned by CITES since 1977.

Killing rhinos and selling rhino horn is illegal. Those involved are linked to transnational organised crime syndicates – much the same as human traffickers and drug cartels – which make a lot of money from those who buy rhino horn.

Started by WWF South Africa in 2010, World Rhino Day was initiated to draw attention to South Africa’s rhinos as the poaching threat emerged. World Rhino Day has since grown exponentially, uniting NGOs, zoos, cause-related organizations, businesses, and concerned individuals from all around the world.

WWF has been working on rhino conservation in Africa since the 1960s, in partnership with international conservation organisations and government wildlife agencies. In response to the dramatic increase in cases of rhino poaching, WWF-SA has launched a national programme to strengthen rhino conservation efforts. Learn more about WWF-SA`s Rhino Program.

– wwf.org.za

RHINO HORN IS NOT MEDICINE

indian-rhino-horn - world rhino day 22 September

 Profile of a Rhino Horn User. 

WORLD RHINO DAY CELEBRATES ALL 5 RHINO SPECIES

According to International Union for Conservation of Nature’s Red List of Threatened Species: Black rhinos, Sumatran rhinos and Javan rhinos are “critically endangered” which is the list’s highest risk category. Greater one-horned rhinos are “vulnerable” which means they may become endangered unless circumstances improve. White rhinos are “near threatened“, which means they may be considered threatened by extinction in the near future. More facts about rhinos. – livescience.com

GREATER ONE-HORNED RHINO

Wild Indian rhinoceros in Kaziranga National Park - Image by Yathin S Krishnappa.

Wild Indian rhinoceros in Kaziranga National Park – Image by Yathin S Krishnappa.  (CC BY-SA 3.0)

The Greater one-horned rhino is the largest of the rhino species, identified by a single black horn about 8-25 inches long and a grey-brown hide with skin folds, which give it an armor-plated appearance. They are primarily grazers, with a diet consisting almost entirely of grasses as well as leaves, branches of shrubs and trees, fruit and aquatic plants. – More info at worldwildlife.org

BLACK RHINO

Black rhinoceros mother and calf in the Etosha National Park. The mother-calf pair made a rare appearance just after sunset at a waterhole. Image by Yathin S Krishnappa.

Black rhinoceros mother and calf in the Etosha National Park. The mother-calf pair made a rare appearance just after sunset at a waterhole. Image by Yathin S Krishnappa. (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Black Rhinos boast two horns, the foremost more prominent than the other. The horns grow as much as eight centimeters a year, and have been known to grow up to one and a half meters long. A black rhino has a pointed upper lip and they are browsers, getting most of their sustenance from eating trees and bushes. – More info at animals.nationalgeographic.com

WHITE RHINO

The White Rhino is the larger of the two African species. White rhinos also have two horns, with the front horn usually much larger than the inner horn. It has a bigger head, due to the muscles that support its neck, as the animal feeds from the ground with its head lowered for much of the day. White rhinos feed on grasses and their broad upper lip is adjusted to this type of food (hence the synonym square-lipped). – More info at savetherhino.org

SUMATRAN RHINO

The Sumatran rhino is by far the most hirsute of the world’s five rhino species, with some individuals sporting full body coats of long hair. Photo by Dedi Candra. - rhinos.org

The Sumatran rhino is by far the most hirsute of the world’s five rhino species, with some individuals sporting full body coats of long hair. Photo by Dedi Candra. – rhinos.org

The Sumatran Rhino is the most endangered of all rhinoceros species; only around 100 Sumatran rhinos survive in very small and highly fragmented populations, with the only populations now in Indonesia. This species is a browser and an opportunistic feeder with a varied diet that may include more than one hundred plant species. The Sumatran Rhinoceros is the only two-horned rhino in the Asian region and is also known as Hairy Rhinoceros due to its long, shaggy hair, in contrast to the other species. – More info at rhinos.org

JAVAN RHINO

The Javan rhino is the rarest of the world’s five remaining rhino species, having lost most of its forest habitat over the last century, as well as having been hunted relentlessly for its horn, which only the males possess. Photo by Alain Compost. - rhinos.org

The Javan rhino is the rarest of the world’s five remaining rhino species, having lost most of its forest habitat over the last century, as well as having been hunted relentlessly for its horn, which only the males possess. Photo by Alain Compost. – rhinos.org

The Javan Rhino is the rarest of the rhino species with 60-63 animals surviving only in Indonesia. They possess a single horn and are gray, hairless, with skin folds that look like armor plates. It is a pure browser, but was possibly a mixed feeder (both browse and grass) in other parts of its historic range. – More info at rhinos.org

>> TAKE THE PLEDGE TO SAVE RHINOS

 

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